Tuesday, August 7, 2007

iPod Generation Job Training: A Wiimote Way of Thinking!

We are all used to the old training methods of watching the long, boring videos on our first day of work; in fact we expect that our first day will be nothing more than paperwork and a VHS package (yes companies still use those). But with new technology comes new times!


Nintendo’s Wiimote may now be more than a tennis match between Mario and the Princess. Some tech-savvy companies are using it as a training tool for new and current employees. It is starting to be tested in areas such as surgery and even as far out there as pest-control.


According to Wired, MIT research fellow David E. Stone believes the motion-sensitive technology within the Wiimote is "one of the most significant technology breakthroughs in the history of computer science."


Virtual job training is also taking place online as well. Second Life is attracting companies seeking to cut costs on real-world job training, employee development and conferences. Using Second Life makes sense in that it costs nearly nothing and attracts companies on a shoestring training budget. IBM recently created corporate guidelines for virtual denizens on its payroll.


I know everyone has an iPod now-a-days, but can your new employer use that as a training tool? Studies and top companies are saying yes. Downloadable worksheets, podcasts, and training manuals can now be downloaded from your work computer directly onto your iPod.


For a great percentage of smaller run companies, these options are clearly out of their league, but this does offer some insight as to what technology is doing to job training. I’d love to hear your thoughts on how you can see technology as a training tool in your office. Or, if you are seeking a job, what is a good way for a company to get their early stages of training across to you. Be innovative, no answer is right or wrong and anything is better than six hours of rewinding VHS tapes!

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